Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Torah laws must be observed even if observance causes degradation or shame


Berachos (19b): Rav said that if one found a prohibited mixture of threads in his garment he must take off the garment even in public. What is the reason? Because it says in Mishlei (21:30), There is no wisdom or understanding or counsel against G‑d.” That verse means that any situation which causes the profanation of G‑d’s name (chilul HaShem) [e.g., not keeping Torah commandments] no concern is to be shown for human embarrassment or degradation.

ברכות (יט:): אמר רב יהודה אמר רב: המוצא כלאים בבגדו פושטן אפילו בשוק, מאי טעמא (משלי כא:ל) - אין חכמה ואין תבונה ואין עצה לנגד ה' - כל מקום שיש חלול השם אין חולקין כבוד לרב

Rambam(Hilchos Kelayim 10:29): If you see kelayim which is prohibited by the Torah in someone’s clothing – even if he is walking in public – you should immediately rip his clothing off. Even if it is your teacher who has taught you wisdom. That is because the dignity of man (kavod habriyos) does not push off a negative commandment which is explicit in the Torah…. However something which is prohibited rabbincally it is always pushed off by the dignity of man. So even though it says in the Torah the basis of rabbinic law, “lo sasur”, but this prohibition is pushed off because of the dignity of man. Therefore if you see someone wearing rabbinically prohibited shatznes – it should not be ripped off of him in public and he should not take it off in public but rather he should wait until he gets to his home. However if he is wearing Torah shatnez he should take it off immediately.

 רמב"ם (כלאים י:כט): הרואה כלאים של תורה על חבירו אפילו היה מהלך בשוק קופץ לו וקורעו עליו מיד, ואפילו היה רבו שלמדו חכמה, שאין כבוד הבריות דוחה איסור לא תעשה המפורש בתורה, ולמה נדחה בהשב אבדה מפני שהוא לאו של ממון, ולמה נדחה בטומאת מת הואיל ופרט הכתוב ולאחותו, מפי השמועה למדו לאחותו אינו מטמא אבל מטמא הוא למת מצוה, אבל דבר שאיסורו מדבריהם הרי הוא נדחה מפני כבוד הבריות בכל מקום, ואע"פ שכתוב בתורה לא תסור מן הדבר הרי לאו זה נדחה מפני כבוד הבריות, לפיכך אם היה עליו שעטנז של דבריהם אינו קורעו עליו בשוק ואינו פושטו בשוק עד שמגיע לביתו ואם היה של תורה פושטו מיד




Shulchan Aruch(Y.D. 303:1): If you see someone wearing clothing with a forbidden mixture of threads – even if the person is walking in public – you should immediately rip the person’s clothing off even if the person is your rabbi. (Some say that if he is wearing these prohibited clothing by accident then because of concerns for human dignity than you should be silent and not to intervene – Tur in citing the Rosh). However if the prohibited mixture is only a rabbinic prohibition then the clothing is not to be ripped off the person nor should he undress in public but should wait until he goes home. (Similarly if he is in yeshiva and has rabbinic prohibited clothing he does not have to hurry and leave – Tur). But if they are a Torah prohibition he needs to take them off immediately.


שולחן ערוך (יורה דעה שג:א): הרואה כלאים של תורה על חבירו, אפילו היה מהלך בשוק, היה קופץ לו וקורעו מעליו מיד, ואפילו היה רבו. (וי"א דאם היה הלובש שוגג, אין צ"ל בשוק, דמשום כבוד הבריות ישתוק, ואל יפרישנו משוגג) (טור בשם הרא"ש). ואם היה של דבריהם, אינו קורעו מעליו ואינו פושטו בשוק, עד שמגיע לביתו. ( וכן בבית המדרש אין צריך למהר לצאת) (טור). ואם היה של תורה, פושטו מיד.

18 comments :

  1. How does this relate to the idea of Kavod haBriyos?

    Would one be expected to remove the garment even if it left him in only undergarments (or naked)?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think this raises an important point. While there are plenty of divrei chazal relating to the importance of giving kavod to talmidei chachamim, one of the fundamental mistakes that we (and our leaders) seem to be making is conflating the kavod of individual rabbis, and even particular mosdos, with kavod ha'Torah. They often go together, but it's not the same thing.

    Sometimes, a leader has to admit to mistakes, take responsibility for bad outcomes, or otherwise do something that may be personally very embarrassing in order to uphold kavod ha'Torah. It seems like very few of our leaders understand this these days.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Observer from AfarJanuary 5, 2010 at 8:24 PM

    Any information on the results of yesterday's meeting with Tom Kaplan?

    ReplyDelete
  4. you have to be more specific what you mean here?

    doyou have any update on the meeting of tom kaplan and the EJF?

    ReplyDelete
  5. AndyBee said...

    How does this relate to the idea of Kavod haBriyos?
    =================
    that is discussed in Berachos 19b-20a

    The gemora indicates that we only are concerned for kavod habriyos only for rabbinic laws but to for Torah laws.

    There are views that you must rip off the clothes of someone wearing shatnez. Others say that you can wait until he is out of public view.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Observer from Afar said...

    Any information on the results of yesterday's meeting with Tom Kaplan?
    ================
    haven't heard anything yet

    ReplyDelete
  7. Note that in the case specified, Rav is talking about finding a prohibited mixture in your own garments. I'm not sure if you notice your neighbor is wearing shatnez you can tear the garment off them, as opposed to telling them they are wearing shatnez and giving them the opportunity to do it.

    Anyone have a source one way or the other?

    ReplyDelete
  8. רמב"ם כלאים י:כט

    הרואה כלאים של תורה על חבירו אפילו היה מהלך בשוק קופץ לו וקורעו עליו מיד, ואפילו היה רבו שלמדו חכמה, שאין כבוד הבריות דוחה איסור לא תעשה המפורש בתורה, ולמה נדחה בהשב אבדה מפני שהוא לאו של ממון, ולמה נדחה בטומאת מת הואיל ופרט הכתוב ולאחותו, מפי השמועה למדו לאחותו אינו מטמא אבל מטמא הוא למת מצוה, אבל דבר שאיסורו מדבריהם הרי הוא נדחה מפני כבוד הבריות בכל מקום, ואע"פ שכתוב בתורה לא תסור מן הדבר הרי לאו זה נדחה מפני כבוד הבריות, לפיכך אם היה עליו שעטנז של דבריהם אינו קורעו עליו בשוק ואינו פושטו בשוק עד שמגיע לביתו ואם היה של תורה פושטו מיד.

    ReplyDelete
  9. אבל דבר שאיסורו מדבריהם הרי הוא נדחה מפני כבוד הבריות בכל מקום, ואע"פ שכתוב בתורה לא תסור מן הדבר הרי לאו זה נדחה מפני כבוד הבריות

    Interesting - so does Rambam imply that " לא תסור מן הדבר "
    is not really a Torah commandment where it applies to מדבריהם
    ?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Interesting - so does Rambam imply that " לא תסור מן הדבר "
    is not really a Torah commandment where it applies to מדבריהם

    This is a question which is addressed by the gemora

    ברכות יט:

    תא שמע: גדול כבוד הבריות שדוחה [את] לא תעשה שבתורה. ואמאי? לימא: אין חכמה ואין תבונה ואין עצה לנגד ה'! - תרגמה רב בר שבא קמיה דרב כהנא בלאו +דברים י"ז+ דלא תסור. אחיכו עליה: לאו דלא תסור דאורייתא היא! אמר רב כהנא: גברא רבה אמר מילתא לא תחיכו עליה, כל מילי דרבנן אסמכינהו על לאו דלא תסור, ומשום כבודו שרו רבנן.

    רש"י מסכת ברכות דף יט עמוד ב

    את לא תעשה - קא סלקא דעתך כל לא תעשה קאמר.
    בלאו דלא תסור - וגו'.
    אחיכו עליה - אינהו סבור דאפילו אמרו לו דבר תורה והוא עומד בפני הכבוד - יעבור עליו, והא האי נמי דאורייתא הוא.
    כל מילי דרבנן וכו' - והכי קאמר להו: דבר שהוא מדברי סופרים נדחה מפני כבוד הבריות, וקרי ליה לא תעשה - משום דכתיב לא תסור, ודקא קשיא לכו דאורייתא הוא, רבנן אחלוה ליקרייהו לעבור על דבריהם היכא דאיכא כבוד הבריות, כגון לטלטל בשבת אבנים של בית הכסא לקנוח (שבת דף פ"א, ב'), או מי שנפסקה ציצית טליתו בכרמלית לא הצריכו להניח טליתו שם וליכנס לביתו ערום (מנחות דף ל"ח, א').


    Rambam discusses this in the beginning of Sefer HaMitzvos and his view is contested by the Ramban

    ReplyDelete
  11. When there is a chiyuv to be mefarsem on a child molester, many people advocate this should not be done because of the shame it causes to the molester and his family.

    They falsely cite Hamlbin pnei chavero as their backing. Pinchos Lipschutz even did this in a Yated editorial.

    But between pikuach nefesh and this Gemara, they don't have a leg to stand on.

    ReplyDelete
  12. >There are views that you must rip off the clothes of someone wearing shatnez. Others say that you can wait until he is out of public view.<

    With all due respect, this is what drives folks like me crazy and probably others from becoming frum.

    Whatever happened to common sense???W

    ReplyDelete
  13. Isn't it just as much (if not more) god's law not to cause someone embarrassment?

    Why can't the interpretation be that the law that it has to be ripped off goes against god's word and so that's the idea which should be rejected?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Since when is the simple violation of a law considered "chillul hashem"? I always thought the act had to be a public desecration*, or especially egregious, to warrant that label. If any and all violations of halacha are considered chillul hashem then the term itself is pretty much meaningless. Just imagine: "You forgot to make a bracha! Oy! What a chillul hashem!"

    *Even though the case here is about wearing shatnez in public, the situation most likely is that no one really knows about the violation but the violator himself, so it isn't public in the sense of everyone knowing about it.

    ReplyDelete
  15. The silence (re the last three questions) is deafening...

    ReplyDelete
  16. Would the poskim allow an exception for people that are not frum (tinokos shenishbu) so as not to turn them off from Yiddishkeit?

    It is not shver for anyone else as a rasha doing it on purpose deserves it.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Daas Hedyot -

    there are plenty of cases or bases for this being a Hillul Hashem or other crime - eg Megaleh Panim B'Torah shelo K'Halacha; Shochad; Znut in public ; Kavod haTorah, and Kavod of Talmid Hacham (both are disgraced).
    In the Prphet Yirmiyahu, he attacks the then corrupt "Tofsei Torah", eg 2; 8 and 8; 8-9.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Kashya said...

    Would the poskim allow an exception for people that are not frum (tinokos shenishbu) so as not to turn them off from Yiddishkeit?

    It is not shver for anyone else as a rasha doing it on purpose deserves it.
    ===========
    that is in fact the view of the Rosh as cited by the Tur. It is cited by the Shulchan Aruch in the section I posted above

    ReplyDelete

ANONYMOUS COMMENTS WILL NOT BE POSTED!
please use either your real name or a pseudonym.