Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Israeli police attack an IDF soldier for being disrepectful

Times of Israel  update: Two policemen have been suspended after video footage emerged on Monday showing them pummeling an Ethiopian-born IDF soldier, Damas Pakada, who alleged he was the target of a racist attack.

The incident took place in Holon, south of Tel Aviv, on Sunday evening, where police were cordoning off a street due to a suspicious object. 

“I feel terrible, and humiliated. This is a disgrace to the State of Israel,” Pakada told Channel 2 Monday. “It’s because of [my] skin color,” he said.

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THIS DESCRIBES  A SECOND INCIDENT -  In another disgusting Israeli show of contempt for the IDF IDF officer attacked in Jerusalem’s Mea Shearim
 Times of Israel  An IDF officer in uniform was assaulted on Friday by an angry mob in Jerusalem’s ultra-Orthodox neighborhood of Mea Shearim, an attack condemned by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as “outrageous,” and by Shas leader Arye Deri as “an act of terror.”
Following an in-home visit with one of his soldiers, the platoon commander was surrounded by a group of dozens of ultra-Orthodox individuals who began threatening him and pelting him and his car with eggs, stones, bags of water and soiled diapers. His car sustained significant damage.
Netanyahu condemned the assault, calling for the officer’s attackers to be brought to justice.
“This is outrageous. The offenders who raised their hands against an IDF officer must be dealt with to the fullest extent of the law. IDF service is a source of pride. The IDF is the people’s army and protects everyone. All population groups in Israeli society serve in its ranks; this is how it has been and how it will continue,” the PM said.
Arye Deri, leader of the ultra-Orthodox Shas party, called the attack “an act of terror” by “Jewish extremists.”  He also called on the police to bring the perpetrators to justice.[...]

32 comments :

  1. I'm a few thousand miles away from where the incident took place. I'm even further removed in terms of comprehending why there haven't been any arrests yet. In the U.S., if there was an analogous case with an open display of hostility toward someone, where it's clear who some of the perpetrators are, there would be multiple arrests by now. Please clue me in.

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  2. 2 wrongs don't make a right
    but I have also had similar experience, with female security guard pushing me onto the street and almost being hit by a car. mamzeirim.

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  3. What does this have to do with Meah Shaarim?
    I dont see any orthodox people?

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  4. Please change the headline of this post. Erroneous, confusing, and changes the topic.

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  5. In one instance, a person who should be minding their own business, apparently spontaneously pelted a man with a "diaper". In another instance, an officer of the State, in the course of his duty, had an altercation with a man in the vicinity of a "suspicious package".

    The commonality seems to be in both cases the men who were attacked were active duty members of the IDF. Beyond that, am I missing some other obvious common point?

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  6. Perhaps the commonality is this.

    Currently, Jewish soldiers in the armed forces in Eretz Yisrael are reviled by many around the world. Arab hooligans taunt them, much of the media misrepresents them, and some college students who identify as Muslim, along with some other students and professors, reproach and discredit them.

    From my understanding, the soldiers are taught, on some level, a concept of "restraint". Restraint under some circumstances can be counter-productive, and exacerbate a tense situation.

    Is it possible the international drumbeat against Jews in Eretz Yisrael, and in particular the propaganda bombardment against the military, has been internalized by some? Combined with an expectation of "restraint" on the part of the victim, this hypothetical unconscious embracing of the enemy bias may exhibit itself as random violence perpetrated by civilian against soldier.

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  7. Dnot you live in baltimore?

    (Actually, i agree with you.)

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  8. Two policemen have been suspended

    Suspended? That's it?

    “This is outrageous. The offenders who raised their hands against an IDF officer must be dealt with to the fullest extent of the law. IDF service is a source of pride. The IDF is the people’s army and protects everyone. All population groups in Israeli society serve in its ranks; this is how it has been and how it will continue,”



    We call on the police to bring these perpetrators to justice.

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  9. Oh, Joseph, you got it all wrong. In one instance a person was in the vicinity of a garbage dumpster and got pelted by wayward diaper, thrown by a man in the course of his duty to keep his house clean. In another instance, an officer of the State, who should have been minding his own job and business, apparently made a spontaneous, vicious, racist attack against a solider.

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  10. Yes, I agree. Those policemen, and their superiors, should have been arrested by now.

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  11. South of Baltimore, about a 40 minute drive. In Baltimore, many rioters have been arrested. In Baltimore, it's my understanding that on a State and Federal level there are active ongoing investigations of the police officers who were involved in the arrest of the man who later died in custody. The case is not quite analagous, but is indicative of how law and order are implemented in the U.S.

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  12. Oh. A "wayward diaper". And you have evidence of this because of the tracking device on the said diaper which had trajectory and GPS data which you've analyzed?

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  13. Actually my evidence was contained in the same crystal ball device that told you the beaten IDF officer was "an altercation within the vicinity of a suspicious package".

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  14. Who cares about the commonality? Is it news that Israel police are a bunch of chayos? Does that somehow excuse the insane behavior of the crowd in Meah Shearim? It does not.

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  15. kishke, you claim that the Israeli police are a bunch of chayos - but that is an exxagerated claim. Some of them are, just like some in Meah michsholim are. Don't generalise from a few to all.

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  16. Having been in the vicinity of more than one hafganah, I've probably seen a lot more of them than you have. I doubt you have any real experience of them, so don't talk about what you don't know.

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  17. As should the Meah Shearim mob.
    Why should their superiors have been arrested?

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  18. As should the Meah Shearim mob.

    If it did indeed happen as claimed. Consider this newspaper report quoted by Yair Hoffman.
    The officer also said that several female residents threatened to kill him if he did not leave immediately. http://5tjt.com/severe-violations-of-torah/#sthash.fAF5Gd0y.dpuf

    Please! Meah Shearim ladies threatning to kill a soldier?! And even if a crazy lady made such a threat, would an IDF commanding officer take this seriously? And Bibi's statement. This could not have come in a more opportune time for Bibi, as he was having difficulties closing on a coalition. He needed to have parties loosen up their demands. And nothing as good as a party under attack, facing public anger. They will then bend a bit.

    Why should their superiors have been arrested?



    Equality. Just as we seek to punish all Chareidim for the behavior of some idiots, so too should we punish the superiors for their subordinate policemen's wrongdoings.

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  19. My point about the Meah Shearim mob remains whether or not it is true that some ladies threatened to kill him. And he might take it seriously if the husbands of the "ladies" are in middle of attacking him, and destroying his car. Exculpating theories regarding Bibi Netanyahu's political fortunes mean nothing to me without some kind of corroboration, of which you have none. Yeshivishe theories are a dime a dozen.

    Who seeks to punish all Chareidim? Have you seen anyone caling for chareidim to be punished for this attack? I haven't. Besides, the Neturei Karta/Meah Shearim types are a small subset of chareidim, whose views are not generally shared by the mainstream.

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  20. I completely agree. The entire story reeks of an over-sensationalized bubbe maaisa.

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  21. Arrested for breaking a car window or for yelling at him? Is the penalty for breaking a window 5 years in jail or is it 10?

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  22. What mob? A couple of bored kids who broke a window doesn't make a Baltimore or LA mob.

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  23. The Ethiopians are rioting today. They should be deported back to Ethiopia.

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  24. My crystal is actually flat. It's my iPad screen. From the article linked in the post above: "The incident took place in Holon, south of Tel Aviv, on Sunday evening, where police were cordoning off a street due to a suspicious object."

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  25. I stand corrected. Indeed, the beating did allegedly take place in the vicinity of a suspicious object. However, this does not, in any way, excuse the beating or the disrespectful treatment of the IDF soldier - or any other human.

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  26. My point about the Meah Shearim mob remains whether or not it is true that some ladies threatened to kill him.

    Is there video footage of the alleged Meah Shearim mob? The only thing that is clear is that we have no idea as to what actually happened. The reports are clearly full of falsehoods. How are we calling for arrests when we don't what happened, or if it even happened.

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  27. Well, obviously, if it didn't happen, there should be no arrests, nor will there be! I am calling for arrests on the tzad that it did happen.

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  28. Any second there might be an explosion. People can die or be maimed. A terrorist dressed as an IDF soldier might be attempting to cause a distraction.

    Suddenly a passerby strikes up a conversation. "He [the passerby] said that he asked them what they were up to...."

    Instinctively, the police shoves the passerby away.

    Brutality? Pikuach Nefesh dictating that the distraction be eliminated for the sake of public safety? I wasn't there. Can't say. But certainly, as reported, not cut and dry.

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  29. We, in Israel, know well that when
    police stop traffic and direct people away from a suspected package---the
    police are protecting us and making it hard for terrorists to succeed. Look again at the beginning of the video
    clip. The policeman turned the bike
    around of the IDF soldier. The police wanted the soldier fellow to go in the
    opposite direction. The policeman
    reacted violently to the soldier fellow’s objection and resistance. I think the police may have suspected that
    the soldier fellow was hiding something or other. God bless our police. Once the police called me merely to move my
    parked motorcycle in front of the shul. Wow did the police examine my bike. We can’t be too careful.

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  30. bobs your uncleMay 4, 2015 at 5:39 PM

    Doesn't matter what he said.. the beating was not justified. Police need thicker skin.

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  31. Ok. Sure. Anonymous poster says, so it's gotta be so. Plus, his comment is on the Internet! So it's REALLY got to be so. Howzabout some logic to back up your blowhardiness, please?

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