Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Rabbi Meisels research on fish worms

This material was presented at the recent OU meeting
Rabbi Meisels Fish worms research

9 comments :

  1. The information on cod worms is readily available on the internet. It seems a shame to bother a research scientist to write a letter explaining what nematodes are when the same information would be available in any library or on the internet.

    Cod worms are nothing new as they are discussed in the S.A. YD 84:16.

    I am still failing to understand why is this a problem now???

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  2. Do you expect a Rav to do a google search and then trust wikipedia for basis of his psak? It is much better to contact renowned researchers directly so that we can be sure of the scientific metziut (and not based on a teenager who edited a wiki page) and only then derive a halachic conclusion with an expert's understanding of the metziut. This is not fun and games or a research project.

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  3. this was the information he presented to Rav Moshe
    '

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  4. See the date on the letters.

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  5. This research was done in 1978. 32 years ago.

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  6. "Do you expect a Rav to do a google search and then trust wikipedia for basis of his psak?"

    Certainly not in 1978. I think the fact that the reply was handwritten should have been a tip off to see when the document was dated.

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  7. Daas Torah said...

    this was the information he presented to Rav Moshe


    Rabbi, I understand that. My comment was in response to the first comment here that questioned why experts needed to be consulted. It was not a response to your post, and I certainly did not take issue with the letter or the research. I see no problem with this approach and see it as praiseworthy to determine the scientific metziut based on the experts' understanding and only then the posek determines the psak considering the halacha in that context. Kol Hakavod

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  8. "Certainly not in 1978. I think the fact that the reply was handwritten should have been a tip off to see when the document was dated."

    That clearly was not the point of my comment. I was replying to what Jersey girl wrote in the first comment. She says the info is available on the internet, which it is NOW, but that doesn't mean that experts should not be consulted IMO even today. Because why should we rely on what (hypothetically) a teenage kid wrote on a wiki page and without any other knowledge of the subject a Rav bases his psak on that? I'm saying even today with this info on the internet, the wise approach is the consult the experts. And in our case, to consider what experts had to say when approached in the past. And let's compare that to what they are saying now. Is our knowledge of codworm any different now? Not that I know of.

    If you're suggesting the information and the scientific expertise on codworms has changed over the past 30 years, then by all means share with us the new information.

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  9. The Gateways kiruv organization owns this hotel.

    Is there an issur to seek out baalei simcha who will incorporate avodah zarah in their ceremonies like Hindus?

    http://www.prlog.org/10729794-doubletree-hotel-in-tarrytown-specializes-in-cultural-weddings.html

    “It’s important to us to help families plan a wedding that respects their unique tradition,’’ said Ana Barreto, Director of Sales & Marketing at the Doubletree Hotel in Tarrytown. “Whether it’s Indian, Albanian or Orthodox Jewish, we go out of our way to accommodate brides and grooms from different backgrounds and make them feel at home.’’

    Linda Ferone, Director of Catering, said that the hotel has held Orthodox Jewish and Indian, as well as Albanian, Palestinian, Korean and Jamaican weddings. There have been Chuppahs, Nikas, Money Dances and Mitzvah Tantzes.

    To enhance the celebrations, the hotel works with special caterers to provide traditional food for each event. There is a separate kosher kitchen on the premises, and the hotel can now offer all the traditional Indian dishes thanks to a recent partnership with the Royal Palace Restaurant in Greenburgh.

    Kamran Imadi and Sara Ahmed are planning their traditional Indian wedding at the DoubleTree in October.

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